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A usually-reliable exponent of good music claimed, not too long ago, that despite the amazing promise of modern electronics to revolutionize the art of music-making by making it possible to produce ANY sound or sequence of sounds imaginable, ironically it didn't happen.   A movie I watched last night on Netflix ( vimeo.com/idreamofwires ) convincingly makes the case that the opposite is true.

It does seem to be true that practicing musicians are in many cases failing to make the leap.  Perhaps that is understandable.  They have in most cases invested a great deal of effort in learning  to make music the old-fashioned way, and they are understandably reluctant to leave all that behind to learn a completely new and perhaps even  more challenging art of music-making. [Perhaps there is an analogy to be made between that and the reluctance of many ordinary users of MS Windows to switch to a more modern system called Linux. To me it seems clear that within a century or so, at the outside, the art of of music-making, along with all other "fine arts" will have been largely computerized, though there may always be amateurs who insist on doing such things by hand.  With any luck, I will have moved the state of such arts some way in that direction much sooner.] But a few daring pioneers are taking the art of electronic music-making through a series of evolutionary generations.   The most perceptive of them have left the "electric guitar" behind, because it is simply too limited.   Likewise those who concentrate on manipulation of material recorded on magnetic tape (not to mention vinyl discs).

I suspect the future lies with music made by digital computer.  I experimented a bit with that some  years ago, tinkering together a patentable algorithm for synthesizing a sound like that of a plucked string in real time.   I know it was patentable, because someone did indeed patent it, or something nearly equivalent. For me, that was a side-show, merely a device to make audible the results of experiments with synthesis of melody-like sequences of notes.  Melody-like in that they walked the borderline between predictability and chaos. 

One of the challenges will be to make computerish tools accessible to those who are barely technical-minded enough to understand the  "theory of music".
www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzoPBj…

A remarkable example of a failure of modern youth to degenerate musically.   In this performance he was 17 years old.    He's in his 40's today.  
oddlydevelopedtypes.com/conten…

Quoting:

(The following is an excerpt from The Secret Lives of INTPs.  I release this chapter into the public domain.)

In INTP and INTJ internet communities, the question of a link between Asperger’s and type comes up over and over again. Several responses typically appear, namely:

  • “Suppose that Asperger’s is simply INT taken to an extreme?”
  • “I’m an INT and I have this problem.”
  • “You’re misdiagnosed.”
  • “I’m an INT and I have a sibling/acquaintance/friend who has this problem and there is definitely something wrong there.”
  • “I know someone with Asperger's and I don't think they're an INT.”

The reason that these questions keep coming up over and over is that many of the descriptions of Asperger's Syndrome symptoms read like a checklist for how to identify an INTP.

  • Lack of social skills? - Oh yeah.
  • Lack of empathy? - Depends on how hard the T in INTP is.
  • Flat, formal, advanced speech? - Yes
  • Obsessed with learning about certain interest areas - Absolutely
  • Talk a lot about their favorite subject - If you can find someone who will listen...
  • Above average sensitivity to tastes, noises, lights, etc – Has been found to describe all introverts: a drop of lemon juice placed on the tongue will cause an introvert to salivate more than an extravert. (1)
  • Measurable associations with math and science - No question about it

Yet there are also some symptoms which do seem to be exceptions to the INTP description, particularly a strong emphasis on details, which would seem to indicate Sensing, and a strong liking for an unvarying daily routine, which would seem to indicate Judging.


Quoting further:

Type and/or Disorder?

Chester (INTJ) (2006) published a descriptive study in which he attempted to ascertain what sort of overlap there might be between ITPs and Asperger’s. He examined 19 Asperger's symptoms to see if there was any resemblance to known type characteristics. Significantly, he not only compared the characteristics of well-developed types, but also of poorly developed types.

The symptoms he assessed were as follows:

For well-developed types:

A preference for being alone; leading a solitary lifestyle; “spacing out (involuntarily);” “shutting out, blocking (deliberately);” having a hyperaroused nervous system; being unaware of the outside world; communicating in an associative manner; thinking in an associative manner; proceeding from specifics to generalities; thinking in pictures; lack of social skills; a limited choice of careers; “relentless reading;” perseveration; and immaturity.


Even further:

There appears to be evidence supporting a relationship between type INTP and Asperger's. Whether this relation is a matter of definition, degree, or actual concurrence remains to be seen.  The question of misdiagnosis should be taken very seriously, since some of the treatments for autism have been determined to be "torture" by civil rights groups, and the victims of "therapy" show symptoms of fullblown PTSD.  Though many of the grossest abuses have been ended (not including electroshock, which continues), many less obvious cruelties continue.  As one person who was questionably diagnosed with Asperger's and sent to a "special school" for the handicapped recalled recently, "To this day, I have nightmares that I am back in that school."  He states, "I never felt like I had symptoms severe enough to warrant a diagnosis of Asperger's."

The recent furor over the belated publication of Harper Lee's first novel, Go Set a Watchman, raises again for me the puzzle that was Lee's first-published novel, To Kill a Mockingbird.

I read the latter years ago. I wondered, at the time, why everyone insisted on talking about the trial of a black man, when clearly the novel was about something else entirely -- the character of Arthur "Boo" Radley.  Quoting from Wikipedia:

 

Arthur "Boo" Radley is a mysterious character in To Kill a Mockingbird and slowly reveals himself throughout the novel. Boo Radley is a very quiet, reclusive character, who doesn't actively present himself until Jem and Scout's final interaction with Bob Ewell.

Maycomb children believe he is a horrible person, due to the rumors spread about him and a trial he underwent as a teenager. It is implied during the story that Boo is a very lonely man who attempts to reach out to Jem and Scout for love and friendship, for instance leaving them small gifts and figures in a tree knothole. Scout finally meets him at the very end of the book, when he saves the children's lives. Scout describes him as being sickly white, with a thin mouth and hair, and grey eyes, almost as if he were blind. During the same night, when Boo whispers to Scout to walk him back to the Radley house, Scout takes a moment to picture what it would be like to be Boo Radley. While standing on his porch, she realizes his "exile" inside his house is really not that lonely.

Boo Radley's heroics in protecting the children from Bob Ewell are covered up by Atticus, Sheriff Tate, and Scout. This can be read as a wise refusal of fame. As Tate notes, if word got out that Boo killed Ewell, Boo would be inundated with gifts and visits, calamitous for him due to his reclusive personality. The precocious Scout recognizes the danger: renown would "kill the mockingbird". Boo Radley is a ghost who haunts the book yet manifests himself at just the right moments in just the right way. He is, arguably, the most potent character in the whole book and as such, inspires the other key characters to save him when he needs saving.

After the Tom Robinson trial, Jem and Scout have a different understanding of Boo Radley. “Scout, I think I'm beginning to understand something. I think I'm beginning to understand why Boo Radley's stayed shut up in the house all this time… it's because he wants to stay inside." (23.117) Having seen a sample of the horrible things their fellow townspeople can do, choosing to stay out of the mess of humanity doesn’t seem like such a strange choice.

When Boo finally does come out, he has a good reason: Bob Ewell is trying to murder the Finch children. No one sees what happens in the scuffle, but at the end of it, Ewell is dead and Boo carries an unconscious Jem to the Finch house. Finally faced with Boo, Scout doesn’t recognize him at first, but suddenly realizes who he is. Boo Radley is played by Robert Duvall in the movie.


Saw the movie on TV.  Walt Disney Studios has come a long way, from hand-animating fairy tales to computer-animating a fable appropriate to our own times.  The hero (whose name IIRC is actually Hiro, a common Japanese name)  is a pre-teen techie whiz capable of designing systems with the alacrity of a Tony Stark (see the "Iron Man" movies).   He designs something truly spectacular, only to see two adults fighting each other to see who can best steal his invention.   But he struggles on,  with the questionable comradeship of a medical robot designed by his deceased older brother and a team of unbelievable older teens. An entertaining romp, inheriting as it does the style of slapstick comedy characteristic of the Disney shorts of the 1940's and -50's, and a mishmash of plot twists borrowed from everywhere.    I was tempted to watch mainly because of the way the medical bot was portrayed in the trailers.

deviantID

golem1
Lorem Ipsum
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
I claim to be a professional artist, because I have actually sold a few paintings, though none recently.

Favourite genre of music: anything but rock or grand opera. By "rock" I mean any of various contemporary genres, including rap, heavy metal, techno etc, characterized by raucous monotony. I don't include jazz.
Favourite photographer: Ansel Adams
Favourite style of art: abstract (algorithmic or mathematical), not "abstract"
Operating System: Linux, Ubuntu distribution
MP3 player of choice: vlc
Shell of choice: bash (Bourne Again Shell), Python
Wallpaper of choice: Supernova 1994D in Galaxy NGC 4526 (see webcam)
Favourite cartoon character: Calvin (& Hobbes)
Interests

Journal History

A usually-reliable exponent of good music claimed, not too long ago, that despite the amazing promise of modern electronics to revolutionize the art of music-making by making it possible to produce ANY sound or sequence of sounds imaginable, ironically it didn't happen.   A movie I watched last night on Netflix ( vimeo.com/idreamofwires ) convincingly makes the case that the opposite is true.

It does seem to be true that practicing musicians are in many cases failing to make the leap.  Perhaps that is understandable.  They have in most cases invested a great deal of effort in learning  to make music the old-fashioned way, and they are understandably reluctant to leave all that behind to learn a completely new and perhaps even  more challenging art of music-making. [Perhaps there is an analogy to be made between that and the reluctance of many ordinary users of MS Windows to switch to a more modern system called Linux. To me it seems clear that within a century or so, at the outside, the art of of music-making, along with all other "fine arts" will have been largely computerized, though there may always be amateurs who insist on doing such things by hand.  With any luck, I will have moved the state of such arts some way in that direction much sooner.] But a few daring pioneers are taking the art of electronic music-making through a series of evolutionary generations.   The most perceptive of them have left the "electric guitar" behind, because it is simply too limited.   Likewise those who concentrate on manipulation of material recorded on magnetic tape (not to mention vinyl discs).

I suspect the future lies with music made by digital computer.  I experimented a bit with that some  years ago, tinkering together a patentable algorithm for synthesizing a sound like that of a plucked string in real time.   I know it was patentable, because someone did indeed patent it, or something nearly equivalent. For me, that was a side-show, merely a device to make audible the results of experiments with synthesis of melody-like sequences of notes.  Melody-like in that they walked the borderline between predictability and chaos. 

One of the challenges will be to make computerish tools accessible to those who are barely technical-minded enough to understand the  "theory of music".

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:icongolem1:
golem1 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
One fan said he enjoyed Shakespeare's plays, but found the dialogue tiresome in that it contained so many old cliches!  The explanation, of course, is that those cliches originated with Shakespeare, and they became cliches because they are so pithy and quotable.

In some quarters it is fashionable to invent a name for one's personal philosophy.   Asked how I see things, I once answered that I would call myself a Methodist, except that the term is already in use and means something other than what I would mean by it.  Indeed, I said that I consider myself to BE a method.   Hence the importance to me of the quotation in my signature line.
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:icongolem1:
golem1 Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Testing new signature line.
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:iconleiika:
Leiika Featured By Owner Feb 2, 2015
lol I'm using ubuntu as well :)
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:iconleiika:
Leiika Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2014
Thanks for the critique and +watch! I really appreciate it!
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:iconjplafontaine:
JPLafontaine Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2014

Thanks for the Fav ! :) (Smile) 

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:iconmalleni-stock:
Malleni-Stock Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
+fav Thank you ! Have a nice day :wave:
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:icongabo2020:
gabo2020 Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you for the :+fav:
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:iconilovepumpkin2014:
ilovepumpkin2014 Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2014
Thanks for the fave!
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:iconstonesorceress:
StoneSorceress Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2014  Professional Filmographer
Welcome by StoneSorceress

welcome to the Stone Sorceress gallery 
please enjoy your visits :D
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:iconpeterbru:
peterbru Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014
Thanks for the favs... :)
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